What's Your Story?

September 2, 2015

You’ve probably heard people say, “I didn’t know I was poor until….” In the majority of cases, the person making this statement has reached a level of success that’s not usually associated with being poor. As the people continue to share their life experience, it becomes evident that they were telling themselves a different story.

 

So, even though by some economic standard their finances were scarce, they were not bound by scarcity consciousness. That is, the stories they were telling themselves included great possibilities. And if you’re like me, you are very moved as you listen. You can feel everything from warm & fuzzy to fired up and ready.

 

But for sure you experience a feeling of great potential and possibility. You begin to feel more and more aware that you define your path. It’s unique to you. Others will certainly help and support you but only you can walk it.

 

Over the last couple of weeks, as I’ve been working on writing my story, it seems that every personal development person I follow has written about telling your story. It has been reciprocity in action. I started the process and the Universe showed up with help from everywhere.  

 

 

 

The long list of helpers included: Jennifer Ransaw Smith, Lisa Nichols, Sean Smith, Marie Forleo, Jennifer Kem, Hal Elrod. Dr. Venus Opal Reese, Lisa Fabrega, and Todd Henry.  Yes, they are some of the most well-known and sought after coaches, mentors and consultants. They have strong track records and they come ready, delivering high-value content.

 

And yes, their stories are very compelling, multifaceted, and heartfelt. If that’s not enough, their stories probably have transformation, elevation and service to humanity afraid they’re going to have to leave the dictionary and be replaced by pictures of this group or others like them.

 

But one thing that’s really important to remember here – the others like them are you and I. We have stories to tell. Stories that will touch someone’s heart, uplift spirits, encourage someone to find their voice and change the world for the better.

 

So, I’m inviting you to explore, write, and tell your story. Here are some of the star-studded, brilliant insights that this group of Helpers From The Universe shared with their audiences. They can help you get started.

 

Truth

  • Be authentic. Speak about things you can share from your heart. Be transparent. Talk about things you’re ready to talk about publically.
     

  • Your story gives your work meaning. No matter what work you do, remember that who you are, your values, and your life experience are all important to being and doing your best work.
     

Order

  • Your (mess)age is in your mess. Get comfortable sharing the downs. Your challenges are as much a part of your development and success as your joyful and exciting experiences. Like some elders say, they are grist for the mill. Take advantage of them.
     

  • Your story is an example of turning trials into triumph. Anyone can benefit from learning how to use their difficulties to be their best. Your trials became stepping-stones that helped you reach a better version of yourself. Someone else can create a roadmap as they listen to you.

 

Balance

  • Your story is a highly valued resource that you learn to use wisely for your growth and in service to others. It connects you to others, helps you establish genuine rapport and create a teachable moment.

     

  • Your story doesn’t have to be a tragedy. We’re often focused on rags to riches or homeless to mansion or beggar to multi-millionaire stories. Thus, we think we don’t have a story that’s fascinating or useful. However, there is value in all of our experiences. Sharing how someone’s love helped you grow or transform your life is powerful. It provides people with an opportunity to conceptualize how being surrounded by love creates a space for forward movement.

 

Reciprocity

  • Recognize that you are the answer to someone’s prayer. Somebody in the world needs what you have to offer. Your story is your letter of introduction. It connects you to others, makes you relatable.
     

  • Use your story to build your voice and speak up for what matters. Your story is a key element to building a better world for everyone.

 

So, what’s your story? If you haven’t heard it yet, let me say, your story is important. Write it. Tell it. Speak it. Walk it. Sing It. Dance It. Change the world with it!

 

© Sandra Y. Lewis

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