What Happens When Love Meets Work?

August 17, 2016

A couple days ago I was reading an article that asked what you’d do on a Saturday when you had nothing else to do. Fish? Fly kites? Crochet? Run? Swim? Dance? Sleep? Read? 

 

 

The idea is to uncover what you do that makes you happiest. It’s something that makes you so happy that you’re waiting for a free moment to do it.

 

 

The article offered this process as a strategy for connecting with our passion. Turns out this is how many people make the shift into work that they truly love. The person who loves reading opens a bookstore. The person who loves sleep becomes a wellness coach.

 

But anyone who’s ever been in a relationship knows passion alone isn’t enough. It’s all fiery good but it won’t last without something to stoke the fire.

 

You’re going to need a supply of wood or charcoal, some kind of fuel. In fact, you’ll probably need different kinds of fuel for different conditions.

 

You also need a good place to house the fire. It won’t survive if there’s rain or strong winds or it gets covered in dirt.

 

In order to protect the flame and be able to restart it if it goes out, you need to know its source. Charcoal burns. But why? What are those deep down chemicals that keep the fire going? 

 

What drives your passion?

 

Why do you love those dang kites so much?

 

Why are you always trying to steal a moment to read a novel?

 

Are you making progress on that petition to make naps mandatory in the workplace?

 

Here’s an important awareness. Your passion is not about what you’re doing. It’s about how doing that thing gets deep inside you. Where does it touch you? How does it arouse your deepest love for it? Why does it get inside your heart?

 

I once heard a friend say that George Washington Carver was a great scientist because he was “in love” with what he was doing. I doubt anyone before or since knows more about peanuts and what they can do.

 

I’m imagining this great give & take conversation between Carver and peanuts. He tries something. That’s like his pick up line. He waits.

 

What will the peanut say? Is it interested?

 

The peanut’s reaction is really a verbal response, an invitation to go deeper or try something different. Eventually, the peanut shows Carver, it can transform from food to fuel to cosmetic and more.

 

It gives Carver a whole lot of love. And Carver loved it right back.

 

 The opportunity to wonder and discover are great fuel for a relationship with your work.

 

It’s a great way to keep the fire going.

 

 

 

Why?

 

Because there’s always a chance for something new.

 

This week, take a look into the heart of your passion for your work. Connect with why you’re “in love” with what you do.

 

Capture your discovery in an inspirational quote or picture. Share your discoveries in the comments.

 

If you need support, contact us. The Living Source is here to help you plug in to the power of you.

 

© Sandra Y. Lewis

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